Navigating The Final Stretch

waving-goodbyeTis the season for endings. A bumper crop of former colleagues are converging on an end of 1Q13 retirement. Our house is counting down the weeks til high school graduation. Other friends are packing up and moving out of state. The next stage plans are as varied as the reactions to the final days on the job, in school, or in town.

Some are brimming with anticipation and excitement for what’s to come. Others are so worn out by today, they can hardly drag themselves out of bed in the morning  … you might guess this has something to do with teenagers. Some are busy saying goodbye, planning farewell parties and closing things out in style. Others have exhausted their reserves of patience with all things they have quietly tolerated for so many years, and are speaking truths they have long fantasized about. (We always loved it when our colleagues entered this phase at work!).

I know. I’ve experienced all of the above on the same day at some of my major junctures in life. Here are some things I always strive for regardless of what I’m leaving behind, or what the circumstances:

  • Say proper goodbyes
  • Make sure to thank everyone
  • Tie up all the lose ends
  • Don’t burn any bridges
  • Reflect on what you’ve learned
  • Think the thought that someday you will experience at least a touch of nostalgia for this phase you are exiting
  • Don’t second guess yourself as you walk out the door.

Step out boldly and move forward with gusto and a healthy appetite for a new world!

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About lynnmorstead

Writing about the small things that shape our lives
This entry was posted in Change Management, Life Coaching, Personal Effectiveness, Retirement, Transitions. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Navigating The Final Stretch

  1. Rhonda says:

    All excellent suggestions! All endings are also beginnings, and if we begin with the end in mind, we can visualize the “happy ending”, whether move, graduation, retirement, or whatever, and this is the “happy ending” before moving on. It is important that each phase has a good end, even if we have to create it!

  2. tina doyle says:

    thanks lynn for the advice

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